Archive for the ‘Romania’ Tag

Romania bans trophy hunting of brown bears, wolves, lynx and wild cats   5 comments

October 5, 2016  Source

Unexpected move reverses a trend that has seen increasing numbers of large carnivores shot by hunters each year since Romania’s accession to the European Union.

In 2016, the largest hunting quotas yet gave hunters the mandate to shoot 550 bears, 600 wolves and 500 big cats over 12 months. Photograph: Radu Sigheti/Reuters

Romania has banned all trophy hunting of brown bears, wolves, lynx and wild cats in a surprise decision that gives Europe’s largest population of large carnivores a reprieve from its most severe and immediate threat.

The move on Tuesday reverses a trend which has seen the number of large carnivores being shot by hunters grow year on year since Romania’s accession into the European Union in 2007. In 2016, the largest hunting quotas yet gave hunters the mandate to shoot 550 bears, 600 wolves and 500 big cats over 12 months.

Over the last decade, hunting has grown into a multimillion-euro industry in Romania, with hunters from all over the world paying up to €10,000 (£8,800) to claim a ‘trophy’ – hunting parlance for the carcass of a hunted animal – from the Carpathian mountains.

The government has claimed that in order to exist, the industry relies on a loophole in European law which allows for the culling of wild animals that have been proven to be a danger to humans. Under the habitats directive, all large carnivores are protected in European Union member states, yet the state can order the killing of specific animals if shown to have attacked a person or damaged private property.

“Hunting for money was already illegal, but it was given a green light anyway,” environment minster, Cristiana Pasca-Palmer, told the Guardian. ‘The damages [clause in the habitats directive] acted as a cover for trophy hunting.”

Each year, hundreds of hunting associations across the country would submit two numbers; the total population of each large carnivore species, and the total number which they believed to be likely to cause damages. The second number would then act as a basis for a government-issued hunting quota for each species. These quotas were then carved up between hunting companies and sold as hunting rights to the public.

“This method raised some questions,” says Pasca-Palmer. “How can hunting associations count how many animals are causing damages a priori – before the damages have happened? By introducing the ban, what we are doing is simply putting things back on the right track, as the habitats directive originally intended.”

Wildlife NGOs claim that the methodology also tended to dramatically overestimate the populations of large carnivores. The official figure for the number of bears in Romania is over 6,000, and for wolves is 4,000. Yet with hundreds of hunting associations each responsible for monitoring a small area of land, and animals prone to wandering, it is understood that individual animals were often counted multiple times, potentially pushing the total population statistics up by thousands.

Announced late on Tuesday evening, the ban is expected to divide Romania’s population, pitching rural and urban dwellers against each other. The government’s decision has strong support in the larger cities, which have seen a growing movement against hunting in recent months. But in much of Romania’s remote countryside large carnivores are a daily threat to villagers and a persistent nuisance to livestock farmers, and many see hunting as the only solution.

Csaba Domokos, a bear specialist with wildlife protection NGO Milvus group, is convinced that the success or failure of the hunting ban rides on the government’s ability to address the rural population’s fears.

“Damages caused by large carnivores are a very real concern in the countryside,” he said. “The system up until now did not work; hunting does not reduce conflicts between carnivores and humans; in fact many studies show that with wolves and large cats, it can actually increase the problem.

“But the rural population believe that hunting is the answer, and unless they can be convinced otherwise, people may well start to take the problem into their own hands. The ban is a great step, but we don’t want hunting to be replaced by poaching.”

Domokos points out that hunters also have a vested interested in the protection of their quarry. “To some extent, hunting acts as a financial incentive for wildlife management, from preventing poaching to conserving habitats. There is some concern that once you take that away, the government will not invest enough to replace it.”

Hunters pay up to €10,000 to trophy hunt in the Carpathian mountains. Photograph: Nick Turner/Alamy

The government’s response is to take management into its own hands. A special unit is to be set up within the paramilitary police force that will assess any reports of damages by large carnivores and deal with the culprit animal directly. The ministry of environment have discussed the possibility of relocating the target animals abroad to countries interested in ‘rewilding’.

The ban comes amid a growing push for the protection of Romania’s wild mountains that has seen anti-corruption officers convict dozens of foresters, hunters and local officials in recent years.

Gabriel Paun, an activist and conservationist behind a petition that collected 11,000 signatures in the weeks before the hunting ban, sees the government’s decision as a step towards a safer future for Europe’s wild spaces: “The Carpathian mountains are home to more biodiversity than anywhere else in Europe, but for too long they have been ruthlessly exploited for forestry and hunting. Let’s hope the government’s decision is a sign of things to come.”


 

 

 

FOUR PAWS launches new stray dog project in Albania   Leave a comment

From Four Paws UK

February 12, 2015

© FOUR PAWS 2015

Charity will neuter, vaccinate, tag and register stray dogs in the capital Tirana

International animal welfare organisation FOUR PAWS has launched its first stray animal care project in Albania, one of the many countries in Southeast Europe in which unchecked stray dog populations are causing problems for the city and its residence.

Tirana, the Albanian capital, is the first city in the country to cooperate with an animal welfare organisation to control the local stray dog population in a humane, sustainable way. With many years of experience in other countries facing similar situations, FOUR PAWS offers a proven, animal friendly strategy to prevent illness and the uncontrollable breeding of strays.

Dr. Anca Tomescu, FOUR PAWS Head of Stray Animal Care, explained the upcoming project: “We are happy to start an important project for stray animals in Tirana, in collaboration with the local authorities. Tirana, like many other cities in Europe, faces the problem of stray dogs. We were contacted by the local authorities to work together and to apply a humane and efficient solution. Like us, they believe that only sterilization can solve the problem. FOUR PAWS is now officially launching the project and is very glad to see that not only are the authorities involved in finding a positive solution, but there has also been a positive response from the citizens of Tirana. The capital of Albania will be just the start. After that, the FOUR PAWS team will continue its work in Korca, where we will also cooperate closely with the municipality.”

“We are happy to collaborate with FOUR PAWS, a well known and professional partner,” said Nevila Sokoli-Xhindi , Deputy Mayor of the Municipality of Tirana. “The Municipality has been in constant contact with the representatives of the organisation, until we finalized the plan for the project. Our staff, part of the Agency of Consumer Protection, have identified the hot spots in Tirana and together with FOUR PAWS we will try to do the best to keep the situation under control, sterilize the dogs, vaccinate them and return them to their habitat, as outlined in the law. It is a difficult task, but that’s the reason we are collaborating with the best team in Europe.”

Albanian law indicates that strays may only be put to sleep by certified practicing veterinarians and without causing them pain or unnecessary suffering. However, although the law also requires dogs to be registered, there are no official figures regarding the number of strays. However, it is estimated that there are approximately 7,000 stray dogs in Tirana and its surrounding areas alone.

In just one location, a FOUR PAWS team can neuter, vaccinate and treat hundreds of stray animals per week, costing less than it would to kill and dispose of the animals. For the animals this means their lives are saved and they receive treatment for disease and injuries.

As well as Albania, FOUR PAWS has recently been implementing stray animal care projects in Romania, Bulgaria, Egypt, the Republic of Moldova, Ukraine, Lithuania, Jordan, Slovakia, Sudan, India and Sri Lanka.

 

 

Second season of FOUR PAWS birth control programme in Letea   Leave a comment

From:  Four Paws UK

February, 2015

© FOUR PAWS

FOUR PAWS has been continuing its birth control programme for wild horses in the  Letea area of Romania, with a new session of immuno-contraceptive vaccinations. Between December 2014 and January 2015, FOUR PAWS Romania’s specialist veterinary team tranquilised and vaccinated 22 mares and re-vaccinated 16 mares out of 100 animals, which were already previously immunized last year.

Recently, the Danube Delta Protected Area  Administration (ARBDD) offered its complete support for the FOUR PAWS project. Depending on the results, they intend to use it as a best practice example for how to manage the rest of the wild horse population in the Danube Delta. Upon ARBDD’s request, the National Administration of Forests (Romsilva) allowed the  FOUR PAWS team to access in the recently fenced Letea Forest,  where some of the horses remained.

© FOUR PAWS

The local horse population made it through the first two months of winter in good conditions,  with FOUR PAWS vets assessing their health as good in general.

According to an aerial census that took place in April 2014, the Letea area is inhabited by approximately 500 wild horses. The census will be updated in the coming weeks.

 

Dolphin Project and IMMP Support Romanian Dolphin Personhood Law   Leave a comment

gazzetta

Dolphin Project and IMMP Support Romanian Dolphin Personhood LawThe International Marine Mammal Project (IMMP) and Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project are supporting efforts to enact a law in Romania to declare dolphins as nonhuman persons in order to enhance their protections in the Black Sea.

Romanian MP Remus Cernea presented the draft on Feb 4 2014 to the Romanian parliament along with support letters from NGOs. The law seeks to declare individual dolphins as nonhuman persons and to accord them the rights to life, bodily integrity,( right to free) movement and right to be protected in their natural environment.

“Dolphins deserve the right to live their lives, free, in the ocean. They currently do not have that right. That needs to change,” says Ric O’Barry, director ofDolphin Project and star of the Oscar-winning documentary The Cove. “I fully support Cernea’s draft law to get personhood for dolphins. And I encourage other nations to join India and Romania in affording…

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EU grundlurade av Rumänien / EU fooled by Romania   Leave a comment

EU grundlurade av Rumänien / EU fooled by Romania

Den 10 september 2013 antog rumänska parlamentet en lag om massutrotning av landets gatuhundar. Hundarna ska fångas in och avlivas efter 14 dagar. Alla kastreringsprogram enligt TNR (Trap Neuter Release) förbjuds. Hundarna avlivas INTE humant av myndigheterna och de företag som de anlitar.

Denna blogg finns för att underlätta protestmöjligheterna mot denna oerhört grymma hantering av kännande varelser.

 Strays Mayday
 
 torsdagen den 12:e september 2013

EU grundlurade av Rumänien / EU fooled by Romania

 
Ett undersökande team från FVO (EU Food and Veterinary Office) besökte Rumänien under 2012 i syfte att landet skulle motivera sitt årliga EU-bidrag för utrotning av rabies. Under 2011 så fanns det ett uppskattat antal av 3.720.000 hundar i Rumänien och av dessa var 3.420.000 registrerade som vaccinerade mot rabies. Med andra ord så undersöktes 3.420.000 rumänska hundarna av veterinärer. Alla som är lite bekanta med situationen i Rumänien förstår att detta betänkande är ett skämt, trots det så blev Europeiska kommissionen nöjda med rapporten.

Läs rapporten här / Read the report here: MRFIN 2012-6392 RomaniaHighlights.pdf

English version:

An audit team of the FVO (EU Food and Veterinary Office) visited Romania in 2012 in order to justify its annual EU grant for Rabies eradication. Romania stated that, in 2011 of an estimated population of 3.72 million dogs there were 3.42 million dogs recorded as vaccinated against Rabies. In other words 3.42 million Romanian dogs saw a vet. Anyone who is a bit familiar with the situation in Romania knows this report is a joke, nevertheless it satisfied the European Commission.

 
kl. 09:59 

Posted 12 September, 2013 by Wolf is my Soul in No category / Okategoriserade

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